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Leaving Bonaire. It’s Hard to Say Goodbye.

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Our final sunset on Bonaire.

Well it was hard to leave Bonaire and say so long to the great people we met as well as the beautiful island. We spent our last few weeks taking advantage of the wind for kiting and the fabulous reefs for diving.

We also said goodbye to many people we had the fortune to befriend while visiting. Jerome, Aga, Sebastian and Basi invited us to their home for dinner in their back yard.  Aga made a delicious dinner and we enjoyed it in while watching the sun set beyond their dock as the boys played in the surf.  Thank you all so much for sharing your lives, your local knowledge and your home with us!

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Bonaire shirts and a mug depicting our day of sailing!

We also received this fun memento from the BSSA sailors! Now each morning we are reminded of them as Frank has his coffee. Thank you so much for the shirts and mug but mostly for welcoming us into your group.

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Frank passed a Gatorade to Rudo, that day’s winner.

We loved having the BSSA kids sail by LIB and Frank often tossed them Gatorades. These memories are very special to us! Keep sailing kiddos. We look forward to hearing how you are progressing and we will truly miss seeing you sail or hearing you call to us from the shore!

In addition to leaving shore friends, we had to say so long to many cruisers. Because we were in Bonaire a long time, we made some very dear friends in the cruising community. We can only hope our wakes cross again in the future!

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A huge pod of dolphins!

We left our Bonaire mooring ball for the last time on Sunday morning.  Just past Klein Bonaire, we saw a large pod of dolphins in the distance.  I’m guessing there were nearly 50 dolphins in the pod and we decided to turn a bit in their direction and get a little closer.  Soon part of the pod came to play in front of LIB’s bow!

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How cool is this?!

Perhaps 15 dolphins came to play and were cavorting just in front of us, looking up and smiling as Captain went crazy, barking at them from above.

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I so wish I could jump in and swim with them.

The water was perfectly clear so I could get this picture of two dolphins swimming just below the cross beam of LIB. I, and nearly everyone I know, seem to smile any time dolphins come to play.  Somehow they manage to raise the happiness level of the boat, even when we weren’t unhappy about anything!!

Our plan was to stop at Klein Curacao for three days and two nights and take the opportunity to be away from any city lights or traffic. The day we arrived, our plan looked golden. We knew there were some serious swells north of us but we hoped they wouldn’t arrive for a day or two.

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A wide angle view of Klein Curacao from our mooring spot .

We grabbed a mooring ball and settled in for a quiet day.  Klein Curacao has perhaps two little places to grab a lounge chair and drink. These are visited mostly by the day boat passengers and are fairly crowded until late afternoon.

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Cappy’s friend is left on shore.

Frank paddled into shore with Captain and she managed to make friends with the only dog on the island.  But after romping along the beach and rolling in the sand it was time to come back to LIB.

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Private boats anchored off of Klein Curacao

Since we arrived on Sunday, there were several private boats from Curacao anchored or rafted up and enjoying the day.  But we knew that before dark most of the boats would head back to Curacao and we would be nearly alone.

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By late dusk only a few stragglers remained and they left just a little later.

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The sun looks like it is melting into the ocean.

We watched the sun set from the deck of LIB and loved having a completely quiet evening. Bonaire is fabulous, but the street does have a good deal of motor noise in the evenings. It was a nice change to hear only the water playing across the beach and hear the fish jumping nearby while watching the sun wave goodnight.

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The buildings on Klein Curacao have character.

While this old light house looks kind of charming, I wasn’t sure if it actually functioned, but sure enough, her beacon flashed through the night warning sailors of Klein’s shores.

We planned on scuba diving off of Klein Curacao Monday, but when Frank took Cap to shore that first morning, a group of surfers were unloading their gear.  The arrival of serious surfers did not bode well for the comfort of our anchorage.  Sure enough those northern waves began to roll in around 11 am.  Rather than stay on Klein, we decided to finish our morning chores and head to Curacao and a protected anchorage.

Our decision was a good one as is evidenced by these surfers loving the waves on the north end of Klein Curacao as we motored by.

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The waves were pretty close together.

The waves we saw were a decent size and they were expected to become larger over the next 24-48 hours.

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That boat is partially hidden by the waves.

If our sons had been on board, I am sure we would have stayed on Klein so they could catch a few waves, but Frank and I aren’t surfers, so we think our decision to leave the unprotected shores of Klein Curacao and find a protected anchorage on Curacao was a good one.

~HH55 Update~

So our big news is color!  We have chosen the exterior paint color for our new boat.  HH has kindly put together a rendering of the HH55 with an approximation of the color we have chosen.

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A rendering of our pretty, unnamed, future boat.

I actually think the paint will be a slightly darker blue than this rendering shows. We are pretty excited! It seems like the HH66 owners have chosen bold and unique paint colors and the HH55 owners have chosen very subtle colors.  We decided to go with something in between.  How do you like our color choice?

Thank you so much for visiting our blog! We appreciate your time and hope you will drop us a line in the comments.  If you would like to hear from us more often, please visit our FB page.

 

 

Is LIB Stuck? Why Are We STILL in Bonaire?

When we sailed away from Puerto Rico to escape Hurricane Maria in September, we chose the ABC Islands for their location and accessibility from PR.  We did not realize that we would fall a little bit in love with Bonaire. But we have.

And we are not alone.  We have met many cruisers and land lovers who return to Bonaire year after year.  We understand the attraction! Bonaire provides a great location for several activities we love.

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Frank kiting near the mounds of Bonaire salt.

Kiteboarding: the wind is almost always great for kiting. We can launch and take down our kites right on LIB so we don’t have to deal with sand on the kites and us when we finish the day.

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French angel fish and a photo bomb by the Spanish hogfish.

Scuba diving: Bonaire is years ahead in their protection of the reefs and their efforts are apparent in the health of the marine life.  These are the best reefs we have seen during our cruising life.

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A fabulous view while biking.

Biking: there are bike paths on some of the streets here and many people ride bikes. The terrain is varied so you can have different types of bike rides. No, you won’t find downhill biking or epic mountain bike rides, but you can ride off road or on road and have excellent views and get plenty of exercise.

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The string along the sand is a “lane line” for swim practice.

Swimming: the mooring area is crystal clear and an excellent place to take an afternoon swim. Plus we joined the swim practices and three times a week we reel off laps as we watch the ocean bottom for sea life.

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LIB sporting her spinnaker.

Sailing: the wind is generally from the east and we are on the west side of a low lying island which usually means pretty flat seas with generous winds. These conditions make for some very fun sailing!

Education/Giving Back: occasionally there classes about local sea life or island history and we hope these resume soon so we can attend.  Also, once a quarter, the local dive shop puts together a reef clean up day. They provide the tanks and bags and divers volunteer to gather debris from the ocean.  We will definitely participate as soon as we can.

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Volunteers for the parrot count.

Recently we participated in the annual count of the yellow shouldered amazon parrots on Bonaire. Approximately 50 volunteers were assigned observation points around the island and one Saturday morning we all assumed our positions by 5:45 am and counted how many parrots lifted from our designated area and which direction they flew.  This year the estimated count, which is really an estimate to determine if the parrot population is increasing or decreasing, was up from 700 to over 1,000 parrots spotted. Good news for this endangered bird.

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BSSA kids spend the afternoon on LIB.

We have also met several people from the Bonaire Sailing School Associaltion (BSSA).  We invited the kids out to sail with us on LIB and Frank organized a work day where cruisers volunteered and made repairs to the BSSA sailboats.

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Even in the rain, Bonaire is beautiful.

Another plus is that the weather and water are a little warmer in Bonaire than in the Virgin Islands or Bahamas this time of year, which makes water activities way more inviting. Further north, the weather patterns are more unsettled in the first quarter of the year than they are in Bonaire.

Bonaire may be a small island, but it has plenty of activities, excellent grocery stores, tons of restaurants and a variety of shopping available.  Even though we have stopped here longer than anywhere else, we feel like there is much more to explore and learn about Bonaire.

Even so, our time in Bonaire is coming to an end. We have plotted our next move and surprisingly, it will be westward.  We are off to Curacao in a week or two.  We didn’t explore Curacao at all as we traveled between Aruba and Bonaire, so we will take a look around that island for a week or two. By the time we see a little of Curacao, mid-March will have arrived and the weather should allow us to leave the ABCs.  We have a few weeks to determine which direction the wind will take us after Curacao.

~HH Update~

This week at the Miami Boat Show, the first HH55 with an aft helm station, Hai Feng, was on display.  We have chosen to have our HH55 with the aft helm version. From what I have heard, at times there were lines of people waiting to see the Hai Feng at the show.  Though I have not seen her in person, I am sure she is quite fetching! Frank actually was aboard Hai Feng for her sea trial in China a few months back and he was impressed with the boat’s performance. During the sea trial, sails were lifted and lowered several times to make sure all was in order and the Hai Feng was put through her paces.  The highest SOG Frank saw was 18 knots!  Pretty awesome.

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Hai Feng wrapped and ready for shipment!

We are really looking forward to the day our boat will be wrapped and ready for shipment to California!

For those interested in a slightly smaller performance cat, HH has introduced the HH48 and she looks stunning!

Thank you so much for visiting our blog! We appreciate your time and hope you will drop us a line in the comments.  If you would like to hear from us more often, please visit our FB page.

Cruisers Workday for Bonaire Sailors

If there is one thing a sailing cruiser learns, it is how to make repairs; often with creative solutions.

Frank decided to put cruiser know-how to work and organize a volunteer repair day for the BSSA (Bonaire Sailing School Association) sunfish sail boats.  He posted a plea for help on the Bonaire Cruisers FB page and went from boat to boat in the anchorage asking cruisers if they would help with some simple repairs needed on the local sailing school boats.

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Patrick, Lawrence, Dave, John, Sue, Malcolm, Ernest, Derek, Mary Grace, Dave and Frank

The result was that on January 23rd, 11 cruisers volunteered and spent about 3.5 hours working on the sunfish owned by BSSA.  Twenty two hands were busy with all kinds of maintenance that the working BSSA parents don’t have time to do.

Boats were cleaned and polished.

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Initial wash…

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Sue polished until the sunfish shone!

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Malcolm and Dave passing off the new bungee.

Main sheet tie downs were replaced with spliced dyneema and bungee cords for centerboards were replaced.

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Derek and John fixed a dozen tires.

Attachments for loose tires on hand trailers were replaced and there was even a little gel coat work done.

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Ernest removes a hiking strap.

Frayed and fragmented hiking straps were removed.

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And replaced with new straps.

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Derek and Frank making sure all the water is out.

There were a few sails that needed some repair and Frank brought those back to LIB. Since we don’t have a sewing machine, Frank asked our friend, Barb, to help us out.  Barb pulled out her sewing machine and made the needed repairs and now BSSA has two more sails in working order and another repaired hiking strap!

In just a few short hours, cruisers were able to make a decent impact on the boats used by BSSA.  We worked on 11 sunfish.  Seven were in use but needed a little maintenance. Three were not being used because they needed attention and the cruising volunteers were able to address the issues.  (Those three boats are now in use.)  One boat we worked on still needs a little more TLC before it is useable.

Frank did a great job of organizing the volunteers and the sailors were fabulous to spend their time contributing to the sailing youngsters of Bonaire.

It is pretty cool to see the kids out sailing and know their boats are working a little better because of our efforts. Plus BSSA had an open house a few weekends ago and added 10 or so kids to their ranks.  I think they will need those extra working boats!

A very special thank you to Anneka, a BSSA mom and board member, who met us to unlock and lock the storage area and give us access to water and power. Anneka has been a warm and welcoming liaison for BSSA!

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