Monthly Archives: April 2019

Dolphin Reef

As Frank and I were leaving Isla Coronados on Thursday, we saw waves in the distance we thought might indicate a reef or shallow area.

We double and triple checked the charts, which are completely incorrect here. But we saw nothing.

Binoculars revealed the disturbance was a huge pod of dolphins! We estimated about 500 dolphin in this pod.

Needless to say it was a blast watching these guys swim around.

We idled in the area of the dolphins for about 30 minutes just watching them jumping and cavorting.

We could hear them chattering to each other as they swam. We were surprised how much noise they created.

Wow! I only wish I could share with you how fun it was to see these guys.

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Cruising Mexico with Mahalo/Women Who Sail

Dolphins in the La Paz anchorage.

After Kristen and James flew out of La Paz, Frank and I took a couple of days to simply relax and relish being back in cruising mode. La Paz, Mexico was a great place for us to enjoy being on the hook again and get to know a few people.

There is a very active cruisers group in La Paz and we were fortunate enough to get involved immediately through their daily VHF Net which is sort of like morning announcements when you were in school; but more interesting.

For those unfamiliar with a Net, they differ a bit by location but each usually has a set format that goes something like this:

The host of the net starts announcing around 8 am on the same VHF channel each day and the order of business usually includes:

~emergencies among the cruisers

~weather information

~boats arriving or leaving

~activities in and around the area

~items people have for sale or things people are in need of

~questions about where to buy something or have boat work done

The host acknowledges boats who have information to contribute on each topic, then moves to the next item.

Cruisers nets are very beneficial to boaters and it allows local businesses to let cruisers know if they have special events planned.

Anyway, the La Paz Cruisers net is very well organized and informative. It was a great way to jump start our return to cruising.

Sunset in La Paz

One of the reasons Frank and I wanted to be in La Paz in early April was that the Annual Mahalo/Women Who Sail Rendezvous began on April 6th.

In 2015, Frank and I participated in the very first WWS Rendezvous as a BYOB (Bring Your Own Boat) on Let It Be in the BVIs. We thought the coincidence that our first long trip on LIB coincided with the first WWS Rendezvous and our first long trip on Ticket To Ride matched the 5th WWS Rendezvous was too obvious to ignore.

So we contacted Captain Holly Scott and signed up as a BYOB. Holly put us in touch with Sherri and Steve aboard s/v Pablo who were already in La Paz.

I had a great time tagging along with Sherri as she used donations from the WWS/Mahalo group to buy more than 20 pairs of tennis shoes for kids living in a nearby fishing village.

Panoramic view from the restaurant in San Evaristo.

The Mahalo/WWS Rendezvous ladies contribute to one needy community each year and this year the fishing village in San Evaristo was the recipient. In addition to shoes, the Mahalo Rendezvous contributed the supplies needed to plumb fresh water from the roadside to the school.

The school in San Evaristo.

The information I received from Sherri on s/v Pablo is that the Mexican Government recently ran plumbing from a fresh water well to the roadside of homes and businesses in San Evaristo and it is up to the individual to get the water from the street to their building.

Mahalo/WWS provided the supplies to pipe the water from the street to the school in San Evaristo.

By the way, the well water only flows twice a week and each family must store necessary water between days. (There is no electricity in San Evaristo. Residents use solar panels to charge batteries and that is their power source.)

An early morning drone shot in Caleta Partida.

I won’t give you the blow by blow of our time with the WWS group, but I will share some pictures of the places we visited.

It was quite entertaining to listen to the 7 chartered boat captains and crew on the VHF net for the group. There was much laughter and banter and each net included jokes and other entertainment. It was very fun to be part of this lively group of women who love sailing and exploring.

Dawn in Caleta Partida.

A couple of ladies joined Frank and me on a little snorkel in Caleta Partida. The water was chilly but the sea life was plentiful and diverse. Much fun.

Swimming with sea lions.

One morning the fleet of boats went to Ensenada Grande where tour operators picked us up and took us to swim with sea lions. It was a blast! The young male pups are very curious and would swim nearby, then roll over like a dog asking for his belly to be scratched.

Fishermen an at Isla San Francisco.

One of my favorite sights during our time with the Mahalo/WWS group was in Isla San Francisco. I awakened early one morning to the sound of men speaking Spanish outside the boat.

Turns out it was fishermen casting their nets for baitfish in the early morning light. It was a beautiful sight and demonstrated the camaraderie of the men and the simple way of life here.

Throwing a casting net for bait fish.

The fisherman chased the baitfish between boats.

But do not misinterpret simple for easy. The people here are hard working and the amenities are few compared to life in the U.S. The villages are remote and most are similar to San Evaristo – no electricity and very little fresh water.

We traveled with the Mahalo/WWS Rendezvous until their most northern anchorage then waved a fond goodbye as they turned south and we pointed further into the Sea of Cortez.

I am exceeding grateful to Captain Holly Scott for organizing these Rendezvous. They offer excellent sailing opportunities for many women on chartered boats but also allow live aboard ladies to join the fun. Holly and her crew facilitate seeing beautiful places while creating new friendships and helping local residents.

This is truly a win win event!

I’m having difficulty publishing with so little connection and I have to work on my phone only, so forgive me typos and abrupt transitions. Thank you for reading our blog. Please check out the FB page for more regular information.

Whale Sharks in La Paz!

While in La Paz, Frank, Kristen, James and myself went on a whale shark adventure.  For conservation purposes, visitors must be accompanied by a guide which is a great idea so these giant beasts aren’t bothered TOO much.DCIM100GOPROGOPR2195.JPG

Hello fishy!

I was surprised how much swimming was involved – after spotting the shark, the panga driver would get in front of the fish and the guide would tell us to slip into the water.  Soon the whale shark would be upon us and we would swim like crazy to keep up.

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A large mouth for filtering food!

We would swim for about 10 minutes then return to the panga and repeat the process.  We had a blast!

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This swimmer gives you an idea of the size of the whale shark.

The largest confirmed whale shark recorded was 62 feet! The ones we saw were a mere 35-40 feet. The life span of whale sharks has been difficult to determine but using two methods of estimation, modeling and field study, have shown two contradictory life spans.  Modeling suggests that whale sharks live about 70 years, but field studies suggest that whale sharks could live as long as 130 years! Amazing.

As we were leaving the protected waters of the whale shark, we saw a large pod of dolphins and asked the guide if we could swim with them.  The panga driver accelerated to get in front of the dolphins and we all jumped in as the dolphins approached us.

The water was only about 12 feet deep and the dolphins swam right toward us, checked us out a little, then swam quickly below us and away.  We could hear them chattering as they swam and it was exhilarating! Sorry no photos. 😦

I have a great video of the whale shark, but I cannot get it uploaded on WP.  I will try to upload it on Facebook….

Thank you for reading our blog. We have zilch connectivity in the Sea of Cortez, so I don’t have the opportunity to write often.  This is the best I could do for now. Please check our FB page for more regular posts.

 

Seal Feast ~ Observations in Los Frailes

While anchored in Los Frailes we noticed the pelicans gathering in one spot and figured there must be a school of fish and it was meal time. I grabbed my camera hoping to catch the action.

Was there a school of bait fish?

Soon we saw a seal surface below the birds and I wondered what the relationship was between them.  My camera revealed that the seal was very busy procuring his afternoon snack and the birds were looking for handouts. 

Several birds spying for pieces from above the water.

It wasn’t long before I saw the seal break the surface and thrash about with a fish in his mouth. I’m guessing he smashes the fish against the water to kill it?

From far away it looked like play, but this seal was serious about his fish.

You can see how the fish is breaking apart in the thrashing process and the birds are ready to pounce on any scraps that fly free.

The pelicans were jockeying positions to get close to the seal.

I think the birds are hoping the seal accidentally lets go as he slings this fish!

Sushi anyone?

Apparently seals consume four to six percent of their body weight each day, so these birds are pretty savvy to follow the seal feast!

I found watching the interaction between the seal and the birds pretty interesting and I hope you do too. That fish looks pretty gross though if you zoom in on the pictures. Next time you see birds gathering, maybe a seal will surface and now you know he isn’t just playing around and splashing water at the birds! There is food to be had!!

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