Monthly Archives: June 2019

The Malecón ~ The Pulse of La Paz?

Before arriving in La Paz, I had heard about the Malecón de La Paz.  I knew it was a sidewalk and a main feature of La Paz, but in my mind it was something like a boardwalk; an average walkway in town.

I was completely wrong!

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The Malecón with the street and shops ablaze in the background.

The Malecón is an incredibly popular and dynamic feature of La Paz.  In my mind it is a defining space for this city ~ a pulse of the people.

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**Early days of the Malecón. Photo credit: SUDCALIFORNIA OF YESTERDAY.

Colonel Sinaloa Carlos Manuel Ezquerro, who became governor of Baja California Sur in 1925, is credited with undertaking the construction of the Malecón de La Paz.  It was to be a long coastal sidewalk for foot traffic, adjacent to a roadway for vehicles.  This development would include benches, concrete buttresses, lighting and even the planting of coconut trees.

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**The Malecón around 1960? Photo credit: SUDCALIFORNIA OF YESTERDAY 

In July 1925, Ezquerro instituted a 2% import/export tax to pay for construction of the Malecón.   Fabrication was begun on September 16, 1926 amid great fanfare and crowd-pleasing festivities.        (Radar Político article dated 2/18/18.)

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The Malecón widens around the statues creating additional gathering areas.

Today the Malecón is a 3.5 mile, beautifully crafted, wide sidewalk lined with palm trees, sprinkled with interesting sculptures placed every 100 yards or so, and benches invitingly located near statues or in the shade of coconut palm trees.

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During the daytime, the ocean bordering the Malecón is a captivating view.

But as pretty and inviting as the Malecón is, it is the people who make this place truly special.  This sidewalk is extremely well used by the people of La Paz.

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Kiddos race about on something like giant ‘Big Wheels.’ 

Families meander and exchange pleasantries, youngsters romp on the sidewalk or in the sand, lovers stroll hand in hand, kids and young adults propel themselves on bikes, scooters, rollerblades, skateboards, etc.

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Volleyball? Rollerbalding? Or simply a stroll?

As we walk along the esplanade, we listen to the music from restaurants and shops across the street and we hear the laughter of the many people around us.  It is easy to feel the warmth and welcoming atmosphere of the Malecón.  Frank and I regret that we don’t speak Spanish and are unable to communicate well with the locals because their joy is infectious and we would like to know them better.

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NORCECA Volleyball Tournament.

In addition to casual gatherings, professional events are a common and popular occurrence along this esplanade.  We have seen volleyball tournaments, bicycle races and the termination of off road vehicle races at the Malecón in the limited time we have been in La Paz.

Malecon-3 The matches were well attended but the VIP section wasn’t crowded during the week.

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New benches and trash cans yet to be uncovered.

The Malecón is currently being improved and one evening as we strolled along, the benches and trash cans were so newly installed that they were still wrapped in plastic. We can see new pedestals that await delivery of their sculpture and we look forward to seeing the latest additions.

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Wheelies, 360s, bike repair and other BMX fun.

I remember once when living in Texas, a young man from Mexico was in our neighborhood and he asked, “Where are all the gringos?” as we drove past the homes.  Our answer was that it was hot and the people were inside.  He answered, “In my country, we would all be outside with family and friends.”

It is only now that I have experienced a bit of Mexico that I better understand his confusion and how different things looked to him. Regardless of the temperatures here, we see people sharing the shade of palm frond umbrellas or gathering along the Malecón rather than remaining in their homes.

May 2018 marked the 90th anniversary of the Malecón de La Paz and it appears this iconic walkway will continue to play an essential role in this city and the people who live and visit here.

Special NoteThere is an app called “Statues La Paz” that you can download and it explains each of the statues along the Malecón. I know it is available for IOS but I do not know about android.  I have no affiliation with this application.

**More detailed information about the history of the Malecón and photos from the time of construction are available in the articles linked above.

Thank you for stopping by to read our blog. We enjoy reading your thoughts so feel free to comment below. If you would like to hear from us more often, please visit our FB Page: HH55 Ticket To Ride

 

 

 

A Simple But Favorite Feature of TTR. Do You Like It Too?

One of the unique features of the HH55 is the sunroof in the salon. When I first saw the sunroof on HH55 s/v Minnehaha, I thought it was really fun and I knew that if we ordered an HH, we would want one for our boat.

Marina Cortez Repairs

Sunroof partially open with bug screen in place.

Similar to sunroofs found in a car, this one closes completely and has tinted glass to reduce sunlight.  It can tilt up just a bit or can be opened completely for maximum breeze.

The opening is fitted with Ocean Air blinds that can be tucked out of the way or if you slide one direction a bug screen covers the window.  Slide the blinds the opposite direction and a complete sun blocking cover extends across the window.

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Sun blockout screen in place.

We love this feature for the light it offers, the breeze it allows into TTR and the ability to look at the mainsail from the salon.

BUT, as you probably have figured out, we are always looking for ways to make things “a little more” on TTR so we decided to have a small wind scoop made for our sunroof.  We didn’t want a huge scoop that would create a wind tunnel, just a small one to direct air into the opening on hot, still days of summer while we are at anchor.

Here in La Paz, we worked with a sail and canvas shop and they constructed a scoop for us.  For now we are attaching it with SeaSucker suction cups to the sunroof and bungie cords around the boom.

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Our new scoop for the sunroof.

We need to make shorter attachment points to the window so the air is brought more closely to the opening, but I put this up temporarily to see how it fits and functions. And it definitely adds a little breeze to the salon!

The bungie cord attachments will be pretty slick as they allows us to open and close the hatch with the scoop in place should we have a sudden rain shower.

So there you have it, a little project we accomplished in La Paz and a small tweak for TTR.

Thanks for stopping by to read our blog. We enjoy hearing your feedback so feel free to comment below. If you would like to hear from us more often, visit our FB  page.

BVIs? Sea Of Cortez? Both Are Beautiful Sailing Locations. So How Do They Compare?

So recently a reader wanted to know what our average speed is on TTR.  His thought was that we have owned Ticket to Ride for more than four months now and must have an idea of what her average speed has been.

This seemingly simple question took me down a rabbit hole because it sort of assumes that the sailing conditions we have had are consistent. This caused me to think about how different it is to sail in the Sea of Cortez compared to the British Virgin Islands.

SOC vs BVI-8

Looking at Saba Rock in the beautiful BVIs

Long term readers know we had our first boat, Let It Be, in charter in the BVIs through Tortola Marine Management. (TMM has great people and they took excellent care of us and our boat.)  It was in the BVIs that I cut my sailing teeth but because I was completely inexperienced, I didn’t understand how perfect the sailing conditions are there.  Now that I have sailed thousands of miles in a variety of places, I have a better appreciation for just how nice sailing is in the BVIs.

But I digress. The point is that we don’t really have an average speed to report for Ticket To Ride because the sailing conditions these four months have been extremely varied. The first six weeks we sailed TTR we had professionals on board who were there to teach us and to push TTR to make sure she was ready to go.  During that time our fastest recorded speed was 24.7 knots!  (And yes, that is under sails alone.)  Frank and I have not come close to that speed on our own.  Our fastest speed has been 15.6 knots while pinched up at about 55 degrees and true wind speed of 22 knots or so.   I thought we were plenty powered up and wanted to stay at a tight wind angle rather than push the boat any faster.

SOC vs BVI-5

In the SOC it looks like we’re sailing in the mountains of Arizona.

In the Sea of Cortez the sea state changes greatly because there is a lot of fetch,  land masses come and go, wind directions change and chop is caused by varying wind.  It is very rare for us to put sails up and not tack or change sails each time we move anchorages.  Some may think this is a down side to the SOC, but it has been an excellent way for us to practice raising and lowering sails and changing sail configurations on TTR.

SOC vs BVI

In the SOC, flat, desert land here and mountains across the way. 

As we moved into late spring and early summer, the wind patterns in the SOC have changed. Earlier in the year the wind was driven by northerlies and pressure systems from the north, but as the temperatures heat up the winds are thermally and land driven.  That is, the wind is determined by the heating up and cooling off of the land which affects the speed and direction of the breezes.

The Sea of Cortez is well known for some crazy wind conditions with interesting names like Coromuel Winds, which are unique to the SOC. Other wind phenomena in the Sea include Elefantes and Chubascos.  This link to the Club Cruceros website gives a brief overview of the weather near La Paz.

SOC vs BVI-4

BVIs have plenty of places to leave marks of your presence.

When we were sailing in the BVIs, the winds were much more predictable because of the trade winds.  Although the amount of wind changed, the direction was usually the same so we could easily plan our destination. In fact, most of the sailors in the BVIs travel from anchorage to anchorage in the same direction. As a result of the predictability of the wind, it would have been easier to say, ‘oh, TTR sails X percentage of wind speed most of the time” if we had spent these four months in the BVIs.

I can tell you that we sail much more often on TTR than we would be sailing on our former boat.  We sail more often on Ticket to Ride because she points into the wind well and she moves well in light winds.

SOC vs BVI-6

A working fishing village in the SOC.

Stark differences exist between cruising the BVIs and the Sea of Cortez.  First is that the BVIs are much more developed than the Baja Peninsula. This affects many things:

~there are fewer cruisers in the SOC

~there are fewer restaurants in the SOC

~many anchorages are completely undeveloped in the SOC

SOC vs BVI-2

Party time at White Bay, BVI is a daily occurrence.

~villages often do not have electricity or running water in the SOC

~there is less cell phone/wifi connectivity (think none for days at a stretch) in the SOC

~there are very few chartered boats in the SOC

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Los Gatos is a pretty crowded anchorage in the SOC.

~there are more monohulls than catamarans in the SOC

~SOC is less expensive than the BVIs but buying things may be less convenient

~the electronic charts in the BVIs are way more accurate than in the SOC

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Cleaning the day’s catch in San Everisto, SOC.

~less commercialism and a greater need for independence in the SOC

~we have stayed in only one anchorage with mooring balls in the SOC

~more large mammals in the SOC

~fewer coral in the SOC

~the local people in the SOC as a whole seem more welcoming

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Limbo time on Anegada, BVI.

~the atmosphere in the BVIs is more like a party where the SOC is more about daily life

~the terrain in the BVIs is lush and tropical but the SOC is arid and mountainous

~the temperature changes more in the SOC than in the BVIs

~the water temp in the BVIs is warmer than we have experienced in the SOC

Hopefully this gives you a small insight into the differences between the BVIs and the Sea of Cortez. One isn’t better than the other, they just appeal to different people. I can’t say that we prefer the Sea over the BVIs or vice versa.  For now, the SOC fits our needs (getting experience on TTR in a variety of situations) and we are perfectly happy being a bit more remote.

IF I had to guess the answer to our reader’s question about the average speed of TTR, I couldn’t.  What I would say is that in lighter winds and the right conditions, she is capable of sailing at wind speed. We have had times when TTR actually sailed slightly faster than the true wind speed. I would say TTR is extremely quiet under sail, no creaking of rigging or slapping of halyards.   I would also say that we are really happy with our new home.

Thank you for reading our blog. We would love to hear from you if you have questions. Feel free to look for us on FB for more regular posts, assuming we have connection while in the Sea of Cortez.

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