Sailing Videos, Because we are a sailboat

Although we live on our sailboat, we rarely post actual videos of us sailing Ticket to Ride. So I tried to take a couple of videos on our last two passages and I quickly admit that capturing good video of our own boat is pretty difficult.

Recently we left La Cruz, MX and sailed 354 miles to San Benedicto an island in the Revillagigedo Islands.  Our passage to the Revs was very quick! We left La Cruz at 4 am because we wanted to arrive at San Benedicto in daylight.  Unfortunately, we were up too late with friends the night before we left and we were quite tired for the start of this trip.

But TTR suffered no such lack of energy! The wind for this passage, although slightly higher than predicted, was very steady in both direction and speed. We had true wind speeds of 17-22 knots and a true wind angle of 85 to 115…. a swift point of sail for our boat.

Our plan was a swift and comfortable sail so we had one reef in the mainsail and flew the genoa.  The sea state was good with maximum wave height at about six feet.  The result was indeed fast as we completed the trip in 32.5 hours with an average speed of 10.9 knots!

As I mentioned, Frank and I were both tired on this trip and I wasn’t feeling great, so I didn’t take video of TTR sailing her fastest (around 16 knots) but in this footage we were moving along between 10-11 knots.

Moving at 9-10 knots with one reef in the mainsail and full genoa. 

Ticket to Ride is stable and comfortable at these speeds. However, we do have to be focused while on watch and arriving in calm water to drop anchor was welcome.

The second video is during our departure from the Revs to Barra de Navidad which is about 150 miles south of Puerto Vallarta.  The winds were definitely lighter on this passage leaving San Benedicto but the wind angles were similar. We sailed at true wind angles of 80-120 and the winds were usually around 15 knots with greater variation in speed than on our trip out. This passage we flew the full mainsail and the genoa due to the lighter wind speeds and mild seas which were a maximum height of about 4 feet.

We had expected this passage to take us 48 hours but TTR had other plans. She was moving along very well and we had to decide if we would slow down half way through the passage and take our expected 48 hours or see if we could maintain speed and arrive before dark…

Of course we chose to keep our speed up which put us in the position of deciding if we wanted to really slow down to arrive in daylight or change to an anchorage that was more easily navigated and we could enter at dark if necessary.

Cruising along at 9-10 knots under full mainsail and genoa.

We changed course to arrive in Tenacatita which was slightly closer and easier to navigate at night. This was an excellent decision because we ended up arriving after sunset and using instruments, radar and a lookout on the bow to navigate the anchorage.

This passage we averaged around 9 knots and we had a very comfortable and relaxed trip.

When we decided to buy an HH55, we hoped for a comfortable sailboat that would easily accomplish 200+ nm sailing days. These last two passages, we comfortably managed back to back 24 hour sails covering 250 nm each.

Considering that TTR carries four refrigeration/freezer units, 7 AC units, a dive compressor, a 9kw generator, a water maker, a washer/dryer, scuba tanks and gear and is loaded with spare parts and tools; I would say our hope has become reality.

Ticket to Ride is a very fine sailing vessel.  Many thanks to the folks at Morrelli and Melvin for designing this boat and to the excellent crew at HH Catamarans for building us a finely finished floating home.

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Posted on February 19, 2020, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Wow! I’m still trying to wrap my head around 250 miles in 24 hours! I guess the downside is you’re not going to catch any fish at that speed 😜

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I haven’t seen ttr. Can you take a tour video sometime to see how it compares to lib?

    Liked by 1 person

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