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You’ll Never Guess What Our Biggest Surprise Was While Motoring in Canada

Perhaps one of the most surprising things we saw while traveling in Canada was when we were motoring along the Cordero Islands. Frank was busy in the cockpit and I was sitting inside at the helm station, on watch, scanning the water for logs and other debris as we travelled.

Suddenly I saw something moving in the water pretty far ahead of TTR. It was some type of animal swimming in the water, but I couldn’t tell what it was. I grabbed the stabilizing binoculars for a closer look and I could not believe what I was seeing.

I quickly grabbed Frank and made him look too….. I didn’t even know this animal would swim, much less that it was such a fast swimmer! Too fast for me to get a picture.

BUT, I did some research and found a photo online:

This photo from Discover Vancouver Island Magazine looks exactly like the cougar we saw swimming across the channel.

According to the magazine article, cougars are territorial and their favorite food is blacktail deer. A cougar’s territory usually comprises an area of 30 to 100 square miles, but they will swim to smaller islands to hunt if they cannot find enough food in their own quarter. The cougar then returns to his usual grounds.

The Vancouver Island Magazine article said that sightings of cougars are very rare and that during their lifetime, many VI residents will never see a cougar.

Cougars have incredibly strong hind legs and can jump 20 to 40 feet horizontally and up to 18 feet vertically! They can run between 35-45 mph but are more suited to sprints than long distances. Cougars are solitary and only mothers and cubs are seen together. A female cougar reproduces once every two or three years. Her gestation is 90 days after which she births 2 or 3 cubs weighing between 1/2 and 1 pound each. The cubs stay with the mother for up to two years.

Image by Matthew Blake (link not working, sorry Mr. Blake)

Cougars will eat almost anything: elk, deer, bighorn sheep, domestic animals such as dogs, horses and sheep. But they will also eat small insects and rodents. Humans are the cougars only predator, though it isn’t considered an apex predator because it competes with other large animals like bears or wolves for food.

How lucky were we to see one and to see one swimming?!

Thank you for dropping by to read our blog. Hope you enjoyed this quick story about Cougars. We were really lucky to see one! If you would like to hear from us more often, please find us on Facebook or Instagram. All the best from us to you.

Blog Delayed ~ Technical Ignorance to Blame

Blogging has been a slog lately because I was using a ridiculous process to prepare photos for our blog. I was using one program to edit photos, another program to add a watermark and a third program to resize the pictures before uploading them to our blog. IF I could find enough wifi to actually upload the prepared photos.

All of these hoops were jumped in an attempt to make the pictures load more quickly on our website when I upload photos and when someone visits our blog.

Fortunately, my son Clayton, saw my editing process and informed me that I was wasting a lot of time and effort. Clayton has introduced me to the Lightroom Classic program which allows me to perform all of the above mentioned edits in one place. Plus, the watermark and resizing features can be handled on multiple photos instead of one picture at a time.

OHHHH, a way to reduce the painfully slow process of preparing pictures!

I am just in the first days of learning Lightroom, but I hope to be back to blogging very soon. I am pretty excited about learning shortcuts since I use our blog as a place to record our experiences and for a little creative outlet for myself.

It feels kind of great to be looking forward to blogging again instead of dreading the photo process!

Anyway, here is one little sunset picture from Canada….. I look forward to sharing our adventures again soon!

Sunset at Hawk Bay, Canada.

Thank you for stopping by to read our blog. We look forward to sharing the remainder of our exploration of Alaska and Canada as well as our future plans. If you would like to hear from us more often, please visit us on Facebook or Instagram.

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