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2800+ Nautical Miles ~ Sailing To Hawaii

Warning: A very long post! 

So what is it like to sail almost 3,000 nautical miles across the Pacific Ocean?

dscf0223Itemizing the ditch bag in case we have to abandon the boat while at sea.

Honestly, the preparation is a whole lot of work!

All aspects of the boat and sails must be in good working condition and spare parts for repairs need to be on board. Planning meals and buying enough food for the passage plus extras in case we encounter delays, or restricted land access (thank you Coronavirus) requires organization, many trips to the grocery and time finding and recording storage locations on the boat.

Passage to HI     A pretty sunset prior to leaving the dock at Paradise Village.

However, the real answer to the actual passage experience depends on your vessel, the weather and sea conditions you encounter and the crew on board.

We were confident that our crew was excellent and experienced and that our HH55 Catamaran is strong, fast and comfortable.  Our variable would be the weather.

The unique circumstances created by COVID-19 made us especially cautious about our health once we left mainland Mexico.  As a precaution, we sailed from Puerto Vallarta to San Benedicto Island, part of the Revillagigedo Islands, about 320 nm off of mainland Mexico. We spent six days in this completely uninhabited marine park waiting for a good weather window and insuring that none of us had any symptoms of the virus.

Passage to HI-8Revillagigedo Island with buddy boat Kalewa at anchor. (Photo by C. Stich)

While anchored at San Benedicto, we once again enjoyed some excellent scuba diving and relished the opportunity to see the giant manta rays again. It was fun to share this special place with Clayton and Connor.

IMG_0115-001Mary Grace swimming with giant mantas. (Photo credit s/v Migration.)

This time we saw more sharks at San Benedicto and perhaps because there weren’t any dive boats, they seemed to hang around TTR more than the last time. Surprisingly the sharks swarmed when I dropped some lettuce off the back of the boat. Perhaps these were vegetarian sharks??

Passage to HI-6That’s close enough, Mr. Shark. (Photo by C. Stich)

Once we were confident we all felt well and we saw predictions for good weather and wind, we upped anchor and departed for the remainder of our 2660 nm adventure across the Pacific Ocean.

We are often asked if we stop at night during passages and the answer is no. We are always moving and we must have someone on watch 24 hours every day. We settled into a pattern of 3 hour watches per person when the weather was good.  If we anticipated big seas, winds or storms, we had two people up for six hour watches with a ‘primary’ watch person at the helm for 3 hours while the alternate slept in the salon. For the last three hours, the twosome would switch roles.

All in all, the watch schedule worked well and the vast majority of the time we only needed one person awake.  I had the easiest watch schedule of 7-10 am and pm.  I think they gave me the easy watch because I planned the food and we ate very well.

IMG_9765Clayton cutting the dessert pizza.

 Clayton and Connor made a dessert pizza with a layer of Nutella on the bottom, then half of it was topped with cinnamon-apple and half was blueberry pie topping. Delish!

We are also asked what we DO ALL DAY while “stuck” on a boat, but the days go surprisingly fast. One reason the days go quickly is that being constantly in motion is tiring physically and mentally and all of us rest, if not sleep, more while underway than when at anchor.

There are duties that must be accomplished often:

  • enter the log:  lat/long position, boat speed, wind speed, wind direction, state of battery charge, water levels, etc (every two hours)
  • check the bilges of the boat and make sure they are all dry
  • run new weather reports (think slower than dial up data speeds)
  • manage water levels
  • manage boat energy levels
  • take watch
  • prepare meals
  • watch the skies and seas in case unusual weather develops
  • check the sails, lines and attachments

But what do we do for fun? In addition to reading, watching movies, playing games, listening to books or podcasts, how about a little fishing?

DSCF0084Connor has something on that line.

DSCF0093    A small Mahi but enough for dinner and sashimi.

IMG_9777Connor created a pistachio crusted Mahi! YUM

He who catches, gets to cook the fish and Connor did an amazing job after Frank expertly filleted it! Many thanks to those back home who helped with the recipe because it was fab. I told you we ate well! Farm to table right there.

When surrounded by water with no land in sight, watching the nature that surfaces or flies into view is interesting.

Passage to HI-9Clayton caught this Booby as it dove for a fish!

Dolphins always bring a smile and everyone awake goes outside to watch them. 

DSCF0111This pod of about 10 dolphins stayed with us for 20 minutes. (Photo by C. Stich)

This trip we were absolutely blessed with excellent conditions. We had manageable winds with only one night of rain with winds gusting up in the high 20s.  For the majority of our passage, the wind was between 11 and 22 knots. We did have several days of cloud cover which made for cool days.  At night it was cold enough to require long pants and a jacket and that was excellent for sleeping when off watch.

Passage to HI-2The moon was waxing and became full during our passage. 

I seemed to have the luck of catching some spikes in the wind during my evening shift and at one point as we surfed down a wave and I saw 17.9 knots of boat speed! You’ll have to trust me on that as everyone else was asleep. (25k wind, R1 main, genoa)

Passage to HI-11Interesting shot of  TTR blazing along. (Photo by C. Stich.)

We had engaged the services of Bruce, a weather router, for our planned trip to French Polynesia, so instead he helped us with the trip to Hawaii.  We think having Bruce advise us was helpful to anticipate weather troughs that were not predicted through our PredictWind weather service.

Based on Bruce’s forecast of squalls and unstable, increasing winds, we had our main sail reefed for about 30% of our trip. In actuality, we missed the unstable weather and in hindsight the reefs were mostly unnecessary. But better to be prepared than caught overpowered.

Passage to HI-7Sunrise is welcome and beautiful when on watch. (Photo by C. Stich)

Even with our conservative sail plan, the whole trip took a total of 14 days and we averaged 8.2 knots. Pretty impressive considering we want for nothing and were able to cook meals every night.

Since Hawaii was an unexpected destination, I was trying to read a book our friends Katie and Kevin of s/v Kalewa had lent us when we were at the Rev Islands. Trying to figure out where to go on each island was slightly overwhelming. Also, we were concerned we might be restricted to one island once we arrived and we wanted to choose a good place to hang out for an extended stay.

DSCF0294Frank studying sunset from the galley. (Photo by C. Stich)

I suggested we each take a Hawaiian Island and give a presentation on that island. This idea quickly became a competition of who could best “sell” his island to the others on board.

Clayton and Connor delved into their personal skills.  Clayton drummed up some long forgotten high school expertise and made a power point presentation about O’Ahu.  Connor was very secretive about his presentation for Molokai and I knew I needed to step up my game…. I have NO computer skills, so I thought I would draw pictures of rainbows, waterfalls and unicorns to demonstrate how wonderful Kauai is.  BUT I have no drawing skills either, so I quit after drawing the rainbow and instead tried to paint with words! Frank was the straight man and his presentation about Maui was filled with facts and persuasive reasons to make Maui our island of choice.

IMG_9767Clayton hammed up his PowerPoint presentation!

Turns out Connor had written a poem about Molokai which I have copied and put at the end of this blog post.  I’m sure a compendium of Connor’s poetry will soon be available on Amazon!

Lest you think life on a passage is all rainbows and unicorns, like on Kauai, I will tell you we did have one rather interesting event.  Prior to leaving, we had tried to determine why our steering system was making a noise that was continuing to grow louder. 

DSCF0126Frank testing and retesting the steering system.

Frank was in touch with the maker of the steering system and several other experts.  After trouble shooting and trying the suggestions, the noise remained, but thankfully no one thought this would create an issue…. other than making it hard to sleep on the port side where the master cabin bed is. Imagine having Chewbacca mouthing off every 5 seconds behind your headboard while trying to sleep and you will understand what we heard when resting. Thank goodness for earplugs to dampen the sound!

One clear afternoon about 10 days into our trip, Frank was on watch and Clayton and I were chatting when the boat suddenly rounded up toward the wind. Clayton looked up and said, “Where ya going dad?”  Frank’s unhappy response was, “I don’t know!”

We had lost all steering!

Talk about all hands on deck! We quickly rolled in the genoa and centered the main. I took the helm, started the engines and kept us into the wind. Clayton opened the port engine compartment and Frank and Connor took the starboard, all trying to diagnose the issue. Somehow the bolt of the steering rod on the starboard side had completely backed out and we had no steering!

DSCF0124Frank and Connor after replacing the steering bolt. 

Fortunately the bolt, washers and nut were found in the engine compartment and within 15 minutes we had steering again! At least now I know what happens when we loose our steering while under sail!

This issue was completely independent of the Chewbacca noise which stayed with us the whole trip. (Now we think this is an issue with the roller bearings but we probably need to have TTR out of the water to attempt this fix.)

Passage to HI-10Frank on the foredeck at sunset. (Photo by C. Stich) 

We expected to have unstable conditions as we approached Hawaii, but instead the wind died, the sea flattened out and we had enough of a rain shower to wash the topside of Ticket to Ride! Except for when we were fixing the steering, we only used the engines for the last portion of our trip – about 16 hours of our 2600 nm trip. 

Passage to HI-5The verdant hillside of Hawaii was a welcome sight.

Even though we had a great trip, land was a welcome sight. Knowing we would be back on U.S. soil during these turbulent COVID-19 times was an added benefit.

Passage to HI-4   A quiet and relaxing view in Radio Bay, Hilo.

This trip was exceptionally easy especially for two weeks of ocean travel. We could not have asked for better weather, wind or sea conditions. The crew was pretty special too!

When we arrived at the seawall in Radio Bay, s/v Moondance and s/v Kalewa were there to grab our lines and secure Ticket to Ride to her check in space.  While we couldn’t greet our friends with hugs or touch of any kind, seeing their smiling faces was joyous.

Surprisingly, what I most enjoyed about coming to rest was not the lack of motion, but the quiet.  My ears tend to be sensitive and two weeks of noise from the rushing of water and the wake created by TTR was very tiring for me. I ended up wearing noise cancelling headphones at times during the passage to give my senses a rest. The hush of Hilo was magical.

During our trip, several friends reached out via IridiumGo to say hello and let us know they were watching our progress. I found great pleasure in these short messages and looked forward to the little “pings” announcing a new message.  Thank you so much for keeping me company as we traveled and for having us in your thoughts and prayers. Your messages warmed my heart and added a lift to my days! A special thank you to Laura who made a concerted effort to contact me every other day with newsy notes that were entertaining and more welcome than she realizes.

Summary:

  • Banderas Bay, MX to San Benedicto: 320 nm, average speed: 9.2 knots or 10.6 mph
  • Total time from Banderas Bay to San Benedicto: 1 day 10 hours
  • San Benedicto to Hilo, HI: 2500 nm, average speed: 8.2 knots or 9.4 mph
  • Total time from San Benedicto to Hilo: 13 days, 2 hours
  • Total distance Banderas Bay to Hilo, HI: 2820 nm or 3,245 miles
  • Total under engine for both segments: 16 hours
  • Highest SOG to Hawaii: 17.9 knots or 20.6 mph

A special thank you to Clayton Stich for most of these great photos!

Molokai*

By Connor Jackson

We’ve been on this boat for nearly two weeks
We’re tired, out of produce, and my executive suite reeks
But 400 miles away lies a great destination
I think we’re all ready for a Hawaiian vacation
 
But where do we choose? We all have a different priority.
Well, I’m here to represent an island minority.
You say the debate’s closed; let sleeping dogs lie.
Well hold your dang horses – let me tell you of Molokai.
 
With many safe anchorages during all passing seasons
It’s no wonder this was the landing spot of the first Polynesians.
Known at times as the Friendly, Forgotten, and Lonely Isle
With the highest density of native Hawaiians, she’ll garner a smile.
 
She has an export economy of sweet potatoes, coffee, and peppers
But she holds another treasure – an ancient colony of lepers.
Unfortunately restrictions there prevent us from going on land
But their story is inspiring, so let’s… give them a hand?
 
If access was granted, it wouldn’t cost us an arm and a leg,
We could cut footloose with the locals like Stump and Peg. 
But enough with rotten jokes, don’t let them give you a fright
Thanks to them is a lack of development, not even a stoplight.
 
Kaunakakai Harbor is the place that everyone loves
Its main street has an old western feel, so we can reenact Lonesome Dove.
Despite it being the birthplace of the hula dance and (maybe) flower leis
The locals still request to please refrain from any of your sporting ways.
 
There’s also Papohaku, a stopover from O’ahu
To ease the crossing from Maui from one day to two.
I won’t say this is Kaui, with vegetation resplendent 
And it sounds like some of the anchorages here, are highly weather dependent.
 
We are stocked up for months with plenty of provisions
So don’t let the lack of markets affect your decisions
I know only Trix and peanut butter may sound like slim pickins’
But rest assured Frank can make 10 kt chickens.
 
The island abounds with stunning geography and ample places to hike
And its home to a Pacific Seafarer Net radio operator, KJ8ZXM.
I saw no mention of surfing, and I know for some that won’t please
But I don’t really care, because I don’t have good knees.
 
But I’ve been going on a while, and I don’t mean to tire us
I think by now we have clear choice to avoid coronavirus.
Your guys’ islands are not that great, I say with a sigh
The only rational option is the gem, Molokai
 
Oahu? Localism. Maui? Crowded. Kaui? Anchorages too few
To go anywhere but “The Friendly Isle” I must poopoo
I see your sad faces, but before your mood turns sour
Let’s just go to the place with the most mana power.*

 

*This poem includes some inside TTR passage jokes and might be confusing.

WOW, if you made it through this looong blog, thank you.  We appreciate you taking the time to share our journey. If you have any questions or comments, please reach out or add them to the comments below.  Stay safe out there!

 

 

 

 

 

All Provisioned With Boarders Closing: COVID-19 And Sailing

Plenty of food is now tucked away on TTR.

OK, that is a dramatic headline, but certainly COVID-19 has affected nearly every part of the world, including those of us living on water.

Here on Ticket to Ride, we have kept our ear to the water, so to speak, while still preparing to sail across the Pacific Ocean to French Polynesia.  We have spent many days preparing the boat, stocking up on information and supplies, buying food and preparing meals that can be reheated in case of rough seas, etc.

Yesterday, March 18th, I visited the Port Captain to prepare our departure paperwork and we scheduled our appointment with officials to sign us out of Mexico today at 11:00 am.  We were excited and ready to depart.

However, this morning we were informed that this port of Mexico will not issue us a zarpé to French Polynesia. (Zarper: Spanish verb: to set sail.)

Hmmmm

The information we have gathered from Polynesia concerning sailboats entering the country is contradictory.  

Tuesday we learned:

  1. All arriving into FP have a 14 day quarantine for the Coronavirus.
  2. Boats would be restricted to the island where they enter the country.
  3. Inter-island travel for residents is restricted to work, family emergencies or returning home.

Wednesday evening we learned:

  1. Passage time will count toward the quarantine time for sailors.
  2. FP will not allow incoming air travelers.
  3. Non-residents will be repatriated.

Thursday (today) we learned from our entry agent:

  1. Cruisers can enter the Marquesas and Tahiti to fuel, provision and leave.
  2. We do not know any news about the Long Stay Visas yet. (We have preliminary LSVs but we also have to reapply when we arrive in French Polynesia and now that acceptance is questionable.)

In addition, there are other sources of information stating stronger restrictions and some stating fewer restrictions and still others saying the restrictions do not apply to sailboats. 

The only constant is change, therefore our plans are fluid.  

Are we still leaving for French Polynesia? Will we stay in Mexico and if so, where? If we leave but don’t go to French Polynesia, where will we go?

The answer is, we just don’t know.  Here are the options currently on the table:

  • Stay in Mexico.
  • Sail to Hawaii then a: leave for FP when it opens or b: sail to Alaska after exploring Hawaii.

These are great options to have and we definitely consider ourselves blessed to be in this position. 

Gathering data and taking notes.

However, juggling the information and determining our destination is a serious decision.  We must consider the length of the trip, the sea and wind conditions, where we can land, if we will be welcomed and how the Conronavirus is affecting our destination.

One huge blessing on our side at the moment is having Clayton and Connor aboard TTR; their experience, intelligence, energy and enthusiasm are greatly appreciated.

So there you have our current non-plans.  Look for a quick message on Facebook once we decide to depart. Until then, we will continue to consider our options.

Wishing all of you good health and calm surroundings.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog. Our prayers are with everyone affected by COVID-19.  All the best from Ticket to Ride.

Christmas, Family, Sharks and Kites

Having the kids home for Christmas is a wish come true, so Frank and I were thrilled when Hunter and Clayton decided to spend the Holidays with us on TTR.

Having a real Christmas tree is unrealistic on Ticket to Ride, but Frank’s mom, Jackie, made us a festive and pretty lighted Christmas tree mural that we hung up in the salon of TTR.  Although Jackie hasn’t been to this boat yet, she managed to make the tree the perfect size – and it’s easy to roll up and store!

DSC05788

The Christmas tree Jackie made for us is perfect!

Initially we thought the kids might enjoy being in La Paz where they would have access to local restaurants, the Malecón and nightlife, but we were mistaken. The focus of the trip would be sailing, sports and family time…. the usual Stich agenda!

Christmas-4

Just one area of many festive decorations on the Malecón La Paz

Although we consider ourselves to be fairly energetic people, the activity level increased significantly with everyone on board; and it was a blast. 

We toured the local farmer markets in La Paz for some fresh food and dinghied to Magote for a kiteboarding session. We also strolled along the Malecón and had a delicious dinner at Mesquite Grill.

But then it was time to get active.

PC220279

Between us and the gear, the rental car was packed!

Kiteboarding is always a focus on TTR especially for Frank and Hunter, but Clayton is an avid surfer so we wanted to find a few good waves. Since the wind did not look  promising for kiting, we rented a VRBO in Todo Santos and drove there for a bit of surfing and boogie boarding.

Christmas-1

This Toto Santos beach was pretty and had good waves!

Toto Santos is a charming little town and the surf beach is really pretty! We spent two days and one night in Toto Santos enjoying the surprisingly warm surf.  In fact, the water in Todo Santos was a good 10 degrees warmer than it was in La Paz. 

IMG_8976My handsome Clayton waiting for breakfast at La Esquina in Toto Santos.

There is a turtle sanctuary in Toto Santos and every day in December they release hatchlings at sunset. I was excited to see the little turtles crawl to freedom and all my guys were surprisingly interested as well.  Apparently many other people wanted to watch the turtle release too as there were about 50 people mulling about! 

PC220284

A little glimpse into the incubation tent.

The turtles are hatched in a large incubated tent monitored mostly by volunteers. Just after sunset eight plastic containers holding a total of about 100 hatchlings were released near the surf.

I had no idea that only one in 100 turtles survive to adulthood!  Thinking about it though, I can understand why – there are predators at every step of the turtles birth.

Christmas-3

Look how small and cute these little babies are!

First the egg has to hatch before some animal steals into the nest and eats it.

Next the hatchling has to walk from the relatively protected grass across the open sand to the ocean surf, and it is exposed and defenseless to prey during that slow, awkward crawl.

Driven by instinct, turtles scrabble toward the light of the setting sun they see over the ocean waves. However, these days the artificial lights used by humans can disorient the baby turtles causing them to go away from the ocean instead of towards it, creating another obstacle to survival.  For this reason, flash photography and flashlights were not allowed. 

Christmas-2

That is a long, dangerous crawl for these hatchlings to the ocean.

Once the hatchling reaches the ocean, it must swim for three days without food and catch a specific ocean current that will carry it on its first journey.  And of course, many sea animals think baby turtles make a delicious snack, so again the little things are in danger! 

IF the turtle manages to reach the current without being killed, it can relax and eat the plentiful food also drifting on the current.

I also learned that sea turtles ‘imprint’ the beach where they hatch and will return every year to the same location to lay their eggs.  Researchers do not know how the turtles record their particular beach or how they navigate back to the same spot.

After catching waves in Santos, we headed back to Ticket to Ride in La Paz and planned on sailing to some local anchorages, initially Colita Partida.  We set out one calm morning before the wind had filled in.  The sea surface was a flat, mirror of steel gray as we slowly motored away from La Paz.

Whale Sharks

How beautiful is this giant creature?

But very shortly, the smooth surface was broken by whale sharks!!

Christmas-7

Clayton is a fraction of the size of this whale shark!

We shut down TTR’s engines and grabbed snorkeling gear.  Since Frank and I have already had the whale shark experience, we stayed on board while the kids jumped into the water.

We launched the dinghy so Frank could get close to the whale sharks to let the swimmers jump in, but we found the whales didn’t much care for the engine noise. So we dropped the paddle boards and the guys were able to paddle right up to the sharks without disturbing them.

They swam SO close to TTR!

Even though I stayed on Ticket to Ride, I had a perfect view. You can see from this video I took from the deck of TTR that the whale sharks swam very close to our drifting boat.

Seeing and swimming with these whale sharks was a rare gift!

Christmas-6

Their markings are distinctive and stunning.

It’s pretty hard to beat the excitement of seeing those whale sharks, but the weather decided to show her stuff and prove that she is worth respecting.  Nothing bad happened, but the day was interesting. The weather changed from flat calm to breezy, then to about 28 knots of wind and dark clouds.  We quickly realized that anchoring in our original destination of Colita Partida was not going to be comfortable and we set our sights on Isla San Francisco or San Evaristo.

DSC06089

A very vivid double rainbow one rainy afternoon.

After about 25 minutes the wind dropped off and the clouds drifted away. But an hour or two later, more clouds developed and another wind system blew through.  The wind shifted about 40 degrees in the blink of an eye and we decided the all around protection of San Evaristo would be a good choice in the shifty conditions.  Plus the wind was expected to be from the north for the remainder of the week and we could sail our way south as anchorages opened up.

DSC05859

Hunter pulls Clayton for a foiling session.

San Evaristo is a quiet anchorage with a quaint and usually active fishing village that was inactive due to the Christmas Holiday.  But we managed to enjoy ourselves with a mixture of foil boarding behind the dinghy, SUPing and snorkeling. 

And we celebrated Christmas by exchanging gifts and giving thanks for our blessings.

DSC05956

I love how Clayton is cheering for Frank’s successful foiling!

The wind forecast was showing excellent possibilities for some good kiting in La Ventana, a well known kite hangout around the corner from La Paz. Although a good place for kiting, La Ventana is not an ideal anchorage.  Instead we wanted to anchor TTR in Muertos and use a car to drive between Muertos and La Ventana.

So we sailed back to La Paz and dropped off half the crew who rented a car and drove to Muertos, while the other half sailed Ticket to Ride to Muertos.   We spent the next several days anchored in Muertos and split our time between Muertos and La Ventana.

DSC06014

Clayton checking out the mainsail and Hunter kiting in the background.

The days were filled again with kiteboarding, swimming, snorkeling, foiling behind the dinghy, bits of boat maintenance and having shore time at the only Muertos restaurant, Cafe 1535.

DSC06033 2

Hunter kite foiling in Muertos

New Year’s was a WILD night…. exhausted from another active day in the water and wind, we sipped champagne at dinner time and went to bed by cruisers midnight – 9 pm!

DSC06082

Once in a while there was some rest time.

All too soon vacation time was over and we had to sail back to La Paz.  All of us were surprised how quickly the two weeks passed!

In concluding this post, I must be honest and admit that saying goodbye to my kids is hard for me. Sometimes I long for the more ‘traditional’ lifestyles my friends have back in Texas, where their families live nearby and they see each other on a routine basis. I miss the traditions we had with friends and neighbors at Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years – sharing meals and parties – but especially spending time reminiscing about our histories together and creating new ones for later.

But then I have to be realistic…. if we lived in Texas, Hunter and Clayton would still live in California and we would see them less often than we do now.  It is much more interesting for them to come see us in unusual places on the boat than it would be to visit in Dallas.  Over the last few years we have spent Christmas together in Bonaire, the Turks and Caicos, the British Virgin Islands, etc.  All of these places add a uniqueness to our celebration and because we don’t see each other very often, we relish and appreciate the time we do spend together.

Christmas

Just one of the gorgeous sunsets in Muertos.

So when those days pop up and I miss seeing family and friends on a regular basis, I stop those thoughts and remind myself that this opportunity to travel with Frank on TTR brings blessings of its own. We love exploring both well known and more remote places on this planet and we get to meet new friends with whom we also create histories.  And hopefully our long time friends will find time to come visit us on TTR.

We hope your Holiday Season was filled with the love of family and blessings from above.  As always, thank you for stopping to read our blog.  If you have comments, we would love to hear from you.  And if you would like a more regular glimpse into what we see, please check out our FB page.

Jumping Rays! Mobula Edge Out Mantas.

Although we are securely tied to a marina in Long Beach, CA, the memory of the jumping rays we saw in Los Frailes, Mexico is still fresh and vibrant. As we headed south toward La Paz, we stopped one afternoon to anchor in Los Frailes and were greeted by the distinct sound of belly flops.

Most folks who have spent any time near a public swimming pool would recognize the sound of a belly flop.  This day in Los Frailes we heard that smack over and over and over again.

Rays

Wings up for a smack of a landing!

Ray after ray after ray was launching out of the blue sea and slapping back down into the water! Of course we anchored as quickly as we could, then lowered the dinghy and slowly approached the rays.

Wait for the slow motion jumping – they are beautiful!

Our haste was unnecessary as the rays jumped and splatted for hours – literally!

There were so many rays jumping that we feared one would land in the dinghy and we weren’t sure how we would manage to get it out without injuring it or us.  So we returned to Ticket To Ride and enjoyed the show from the boat.

Hours later the rays were still jumping. In fact, when we went to bed we could still hear the repeated plops through the open hatch.  Even when we awakened, the rays were still jumping.

Rays-2

Mr. Ray mid-flight.

There are a few theories about why rays jump out of the water like this:

  1. They are trying to remove parasites. (Yuck)
  2. They are excited about food in the area.
  3. This is a form of communication.
  4. This is part of a mating ritual or dance.

Personally, I think this was a combination of numbers two and four since the jumping lasted for well over 12 hours! Either that or these rays were particularly talkative or especially dirty.   🙂

I was trying to determine if these were Mobula or Manta Rays, but according to Dive Magazine, UK, there are no more Manta Rays, only Mobula, at least when determining scientific classifications.  This combination of Mantas and Mobulas comes after a DNA study that reclassified Mantas into the Mobulas species.

While the DNA may classify these rays as one group, there are some physical differences. The primary difference is that the Manta Ray has its’ mouth in front of the body and the Mobula’s mouth is positioned a little further back, but still in front of the body.

Rays-1

My favorite picture of the rays.

Regardless of how the rays are classified, they were an excellent source of entertainment that day in Los Frailes.  Every once in a while the slapping sound would stop and the bay would quiet. But soon enough the rays would begin their jump and flop once more and the sound alone would bring a smile to my face.

Thank you for reading our blog. We would love to hear about your favorite ray experiences or your thoughts about our encounter. If you would like to hear from us more often, please check out our FB page.

 

Santa Rosalia ~ French Influence In The Baja.

Like many cruisers, our northern most stop in the Sea of Cortez was the town of Santa Rosalia which has a relatively large population of approximately 15,000 residents. Santa Rosalia is a popular port of call and often the point from which cruisers jump across the Sea to the mainland side. We had no plans to cross to the mainland, but had heard so many positive comments about Santa Rosalia, we decided to check it out.

Frailes-1

Old area of Santa Rosalia and TTR at the marina in the background.

According to San Diego History Center 1988 Institute of History, Santa Rosalia’s beginnings can be traced to a rancher by the name of Jose Rosas who, in 1868, discovered some “strange green pellets” in the area and sent them to Guaymas, on the mainland, to be analyzed. Response to the pellets was very quick and two German men, G. Blumhardt and Julio Müller, paid Rosas 16 pesos to show them where the pellets were found. Blumhardt and Müller immediately began prospecting the area.

In a couple of years, two men by the name of  Guillermo Eisenmann and Eustaquio Valle had managed to buy out smaller prospectors who had been working the area near Jose Rosas’s find since 1870.  Eisenmann and Valle started a copper mining company called El Boleo, which is Spanish for copper-bearing pellets. 

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Boys of all ages love trains, even old trains.

Eisenmann and Valle brought one hundred Yaqui Indians from the prison of Guaymas as the first laborers to dig the mines.  In time, many more Yaquis were brought to live in barracks and they continued to be an important labor force in Santa Rosalia.  By 1884, El Boleo was a well established mining company with 11 mines and a significant network of tunnels.

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I’m not sure why an overhead sidewalk was needed. But it is unique.

El Boleo is usually credited with the founding of Santa Rosalia, but in May of 1885, a French company bought El Boleo from Eisenmann and Valle.  It is the French influence from the Compagnie du Boleo still visible in the buildings of Santa Rosalia that give this town its unique flavor.

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Not the usual architecture of the Baja California Sur.

The French influence in Santa Rosalia was most often mentioned by cruisers who told us about Santa Rosalia and indeed, the building architecture is unique among the Baja Peninsula anchorages where we stopped.

Today there is a mining museum which overlooks some very decrepit remnants of the mining buildings along the waterfront.  The buildings are interesting because they allow one to have a feeling for how large the operations was; but they look like they could fall apart any day.

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These old mining buildings have seen better days.

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Iglesia de Bárbara designed by G. Eiffel.

Another attraction in Santa Rosalia is the Iglesia de Bárbara. Supposedly the French architect Gustave Eiffel designed this church and won an award at the 1889 Exposition Universelle.  The church is made of stamped squares of steel and was dismantled after the Exposition to be transported to Africa.  

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The interior of Iglesia de Bárbara is bright, clean and fairly simple.

However, the director of Compagnie du Boleo found it disassembled in Belgium, so he bought the church and had it shipped to Santa Rosalia, where it was reassembled in 1897. Some slight modifications have been made to Iglesia de Bárbara, but it is still in excellent condition.

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Something about this grabbed my eye.

Although we found the buildings and history of Santa Rosalia interesting and colorful, what we truly enjoyed about this town was the lack of tourism and the friendliness of the people.  Santa Rosalia is what I would consider a working or average town, sort of an “Everyman’s” town. We really enjoyed ambling along the streets and being part of the regular, day to day scene.

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A typical street in the older part of Santa Rosalia.

Aannnddd, I have to admit, we spent a fair number of days tasting a variety of taco places! 

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Our first stop with Laura and Don of s/v Intuition. This one was good but….

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This was our favorite taco spot in Santa Rosalia.

Our favorite spot, Super Taco, was a small, very casual place right on the street and popular with the locals.  For $5 US, the two of us enjoyed lunch here more than once!

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Super Taco is clean inside with maybe five small, round,f plastic picnic tables.

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Gotta love a good tortillaria!

After eating so many tacos, we stopped at a tortilleria to buy our own fresh flour tortillas. They were excellent! And allowed us to have a taste of Santa Rosalia after we sailed away.

Religion is a major influence and visible all along the Baja. Churches and crosses are numerous.  Along sidewalks and on highways there are grottos. Even in bars and restaurants there are pictures of the Virgin Mary or Jesus.  Our Lady of Guadeloupe is especially popular. Often the highest hill in town has a cross boldly proclaiming the importance of God here.

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Our path up to the graveyard.

Santa Rosalia was no different. We hiked up the hill to the cross, to see the graveyard and the view. Okay, maybe we also needed to walk off some tacos!

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The view and the breeze were worth the walk.

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Another God-centered view from up on the hill.

Santa Rosalia is the only place we have seen wood siding on the majority of the buildings rather than the more typical stones or stucco. The wood certainly allows owners to express their love for bright colors!

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The paint is accentuated by the muted color of the land in the background.

All together we spent about a week in Santa Rosalia. We never really ventured into the newer parts but instead stayed in the area close to the marina where the original town developed.  We definitely enjoyed being there and hope to visit again next year.  If you like visiting towns away from tourism, do visit Santa Rosalia.  And be sure to stop by Super Taco – we think you’ll like it!

Thank you very much for stopping by our blog.  We would love to hear your thoughts, so make a comment below.  If you would like to hear from us more often, visit our FB page: HH55 Ticket To Ride.

 

The Malecón ~ The Pulse of La Paz?

Before arriving in La Paz, I had heard about the Malecón de La Paz.  I knew it was a sidewalk and a main feature of La Paz, but in my mind it was something like a boardwalk; an average walkway in town.

I was completely wrong!

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The Malecón with the street and shops ablaze in the background.

The Malecón is an incredibly popular and dynamic feature of La Paz.  In my mind it is a defining space for this city ~ a pulse of the people.

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**Early days of the Malecón. Photo credit: SUDCALIFORNIA OF YESTERDAY.

Colonel Sinaloa Carlos Manuel Ezquerro, who became governor of Baja California Sur in 1925, is credited with undertaking the construction of the Malecón de La Paz.  It was to be a long coastal sidewalk for foot traffic, adjacent to a roadway for vehicles.  This development would include benches, concrete buttresses, lighting and even the planting of coconut trees.

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**The Malecón around 1960? Photo credit: SUDCALIFORNIA OF YESTERDAY 

In July 1925, Ezquerro instituted a 2% import/export tax to pay for construction of the Malecón.   Fabrication was begun on September 16, 1926 amid great fanfare and crowd-pleasing festivities.        (Radar Político article dated 2/18/18.)

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The Malecón widens around the statues creating additional gathering areas.

Today the Malecón is a 3.5 mile, beautifully crafted, wide sidewalk lined with palm trees, sprinkled with interesting sculptures placed every 100 yards or so, and benches invitingly located near statues or in the shade of coconut palm trees.

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During the daytime, the ocean bordering the Malecón is a captivating view.

But as pretty and inviting as the Malecón is, it is the people who make this place truly special.  This sidewalk is extremely well used by the people of La Paz.

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Kiddos race about on something like giant ‘Big Wheels.’ 

Families meander and exchange pleasantries, youngsters romp on the sidewalk or in the sand, lovers stroll hand in hand, kids and young adults propel themselves on bikes, scooters, rollerblades, skateboards, etc.

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Volleyball? Rollerbalding? Or simply a stroll?

As we walk along the esplanade, we listen to the music from restaurants and shops across the street and we hear the laughter of the many people around us.  It is easy to feel the warmth and welcoming atmosphere of the Malecón.  Frank and I regret that we don’t speak Spanish and are unable to communicate well with the locals because their joy is infectious and we would like to know them better.

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NORCECA Volleyball Tournament.

In addition to casual gatherings, professional events are a common and popular occurrence along this esplanade.  We have seen volleyball tournaments, bicycle races and the termination of off road vehicle races at the Malecón in the limited time we have been in La Paz.

Malecon-3 The matches were well attended but the VIP section wasn’t crowded during the week.

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New benches and trash cans yet to be uncovered.

The Malecón is currently being improved and one evening as we strolled along, the benches and trash cans were so newly installed that they were still wrapped in plastic. We can see new pedestals that await delivery of their sculpture and we look forward to seeing the latest additions.

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Wheelies, 360s, bike repair and other BMX fun.

I remember once when living in Texas, a young man from Mexico was in our neighborhood and he asked, “Where are all the gringos?” as we drove past the homes.  Our answer was that it was hot and the people were inside.  He answered, “In my country, we would all be outside with family and friends.”

It is only now that I have experienced a bit of Mexico that I better understand his confusion and how different things looked to him. Regardless of the temperatures here, we see people sharing the shade of palm frond umbrellas or gathering along the Malecón rather than remaining in their homes.

May 2018 marked the 90th anniversary of the Malecón de La Paz and it appears this iconic walkway will continue to play an essential role in this city and the people who live and visit here.

Special NoteThere is an app called “Statues La Paz” that you can download and it explains each of the statues along the Malecón. I know it is available for IOS but I do not know about android.  I have no affiliation with this application.

**More detailed information about the history of the Malecón and photos from the time of construction are available in the articles linked above.

Thank you for stopping by to read our blog. We enjoy reading your thoughts so feel free to comment below. If you would like to hear from us more often, please visit our FB Page: HH55 Ticket To Ride

 

 

 

BVIs? Sea Of Cortez? Both Are Beautiful Sailing Locations. So How Do They Compare?

So recently a reader wanted to know what our average speed is on TTR.  His thought was that we have owned Ticket to Ride for more than four months now and must have an idea of what her average speed has been.

This seemingly simple question took me down a rabbit hole because it sort of assumes that the sailing conditions we have had are consistent. This caused me to think about how different it is to sail in the Sea of Cortez compared to the British Virgin Islands.

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Looking at Saba Rock in the beautiful BVIs

Long term readers know we had our first boat, Let It Be, in charter in the BVIs through Tortola Marine Management. (TMM has great people and they took excellent care of us and our boat.)  It was in the BVIs that I cut my sailing teeth but because I was completely inexperienced, I didn’t understand how perfect the sailing conditions are there.  Now that I have sailed thousands of miles in a variety of places, I have a better appreciation for just how nice sailing is in the BVIs.

But I digress. The point is that we don’t really have an average speed to report for Ticket To Ride because the sailing conditions these four months have been extremely varied. The first six weeks we sailed TTR we had professionals on board who were there to teach us and to push TTR to make sure she was ready to go.  During that time our fastest recorded speed was 24.7 knots!  (And yes, that is under sails alone.)  Frank and I have not come close to that speed on our own.  Our fastest speed has been 15.6 knots while pinched up at about 55 degrees and true wind speed of 22 knots or so.   I thought we were plenty powered up and wanted to stay at a tight wind angle rather than push the boat any faster.

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In the SOC it looks like we’re sailing in the mountains of Arizona.

In the Sea of Cortez the sea state changes greatly because there is a lot of fetch,  land masses come and go, wind directions change and chop is caused by varying wind.  It is very rare for us to put sails up and not tack or change sails each time we move anchorages.  Some may think this is a down side to the SOC, but it has been an excellent way for us to practice raising and lowering sails and changing sail configurations on TTR.

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In the SOC, flat, desert land here and mountains across the way. 

As we moved into late spring and early summer, the wind patterns in the SOC have changed. Earlier in the year the wind was driven by northerlies and pressure systems from the north, but as the temperatures heat up the winds are thermally and land driven.  That is, the wind is determined by the heating up and cooling off of the land which affects the speed and direction of the breezes.

The Sea of Cortez is well known for some crazy wind conditions with interesting names like Coromuel Winds, which are unique to the SOC. Other wind phenomena in the Sea include Elefantes and Chubascos.  This link to the Club Cruceros website gives a brief overview of the weather near La Paz.

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BVIs have plenty of places to leave marks of your presence.

When we were sailing in the BVIs, the winds were much more predictable because of the trade winds.  Although the amount of wind changed, the direction was usually the same so we could easily plan our destination. In fact, most of the sailors in the BVIs travel from anchorage to anchorage in the same direction. As a result of the predictability of the wind, it would have been easier to say, ‘oh, TTR sails X percentage of wind speed most of the time” if we had spent these four months in the BVIs.

I can tell you that we sail much more often on TTR than we would be sailing on our former boat.  We sail more often on Ticket to Ride because she points into the wind well and she moves well in light winds.

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A working fishing village in the SOC.

Stark differences exist between cruising the BVIs and the Sea of Cortez.  First is that the BVIs are much more developed than the Baja Peninsula. This affects many things:

~there are fewer cruisers in the SOC

~there are fewer restaurants in the SOC

~many anchorages are completely undeveloped in the SOC

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Party time at White Bay, BVI is a daily occurrence.

~villages often do not have electricity or running water in the SOC

~there is less cell phone/wifi connectivity (think none for days at a stretch) in the SOC

~there are very few chartered boats in the SOC

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Los Gatos is a pretty crowded anchorage in the SOC.

~there are more monohulls than catamarans in the SOC

~SOC is less expensive than the BVIs but buying things may be less convenient

~the electronic charts in the BVIs are way more accurate than in the SOC

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Cleaning the day’s catch in San Everisto, SOC.

~less commercialism and a greater need for independence in the SOC

~we have stayed in only one anchorage with mooring balls in the SOC

~more large mammals in the SOC

~fewer coral in the SOC

~the local people in the SOC as a whole seem more welcoming

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Limbo time on Anegada, BVI.

~the atmosphere in the BVIs is more like a party where the SOC is more about daily life

~the terrain in the BVIs is lush and tropical but the SOC is arid and mountainous

~the temperature changes more in the SOC than in the BVIs

~the water temp in the BVIs is warmer than we have experienced in the SOC

Hopefully this gives you a small insight into the differences between the BVIs and the Sea of Cortez. One isn’t better than the other, they just appeal to different people. I can’t say that we prefer the Sea over the BVIs or vice versa.  For now, the SOC fits our needs (getting experience on TTR in a variety of situations) and we are perfectly happy being a bit more remote.

IF I had to guess the answer to our reader’s question about the average speed of TTR, I couldn’t.  What I would say is that in lighter winds and the right conditions, she is capable of sailing at wind speed. We have had times when TTR actually sailed slightly faster than the true wind speed. I would say TTR is extremely quiet under sail, no creaking of rigging or slapping of halyards.   I would also say that we are really happy with our new home.

Thank you for reading our blog. We would love to hear from you if you have questions. Feel free to look for us on FB for more regular posts, assuming we have connection while in the Sea of Cortez.

Geological History and Unusual Sights Define the SOC.

We have been in the Sea of Cortez for two months and we continue to be thrilled with the visual overload here.

Overview-5

TTR at anchor at Isla Coronados.

Our time in the Sea is limited this year because we need to go back to the States to have some warranty work done on Ticket to Ride.  As a result, we have covered a lot of area at a fast clip. We have seen many beautiful places and I will share some thoughts and sights through pictures in this post.

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I know there is a story written in these layers but I don’t know how to read it!

Frank and I  should have studied geology to fully appreciate all the beauty and history of this stunning area. Every part of the Sea is dramatically framed by rugged and arid land masses. When we traveled the U.S. by RV this summer, we felt our lack of geological knowledge but we were fortunate that many of the parks had signs explaining the history told in the layered deposits of the cliffs and canyons we visited.

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Very well defined layers at Punta Pulpito.

Here in Mexico, we sail or dinghy or hike past amazingly well defined layers of the earth’s history but we have no way to learn the story revealed by the lines.  The internet is unavailable and neither of us studied geology, so we can’t even pull on long forgotten knowledge.

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We hid from SW winds at colorful Bahia Cobre. 

However, even without an understanding of the rocky history, we are amazed at the beauty and diversity of the formations we see.

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The back side of Caleta Partida where we took the dinghy into small sea caves.

Any geology buffs want to chime in and explain the geological history for any of these pictures?

But the SOC isn’t just about geology.  While returning to La Paz, the wind was shifting and changing and as we were accepting the need to furl sails and start engines, we came across a pod of whales. The rocky bluffs near Espiritu Santo made a perfect backdrop for this whale spray.

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A whale’s blow is it exhaling air from its’ lungs. 

There were about 10 whales and each would surface three or four times before disappearing for a while. None of these whales breached and we never saw the tail. I’m not certain but I think they were Fin Whales.  (Can anyone confirm that?)

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Such a big mammal and such a small dorsal fin.

Fin Whales are the fastest of all whales and can swim up to 37 kilometers per hour! After rolling in our foresail, we just drifted for about an hour watching the whales surface all around us. It was a thrilling experience.

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The whales were pretty close to TTR!

Each day we see amazing things that make us pause and appreciate the Sea of Cortez again and again. Sometimes it is a beautiful sunrise….

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Sunrise at Caleta Partida.

Other times it’s the birds we see coasting on air drafts or diving like sharpened arrows into the blue waters. Or it is spying Blue Footed Boobies like these on nearby ledges.

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Blue footed boobies!

The depth of the blue color of the male Booby’s feet play an important role in courtship of the females as the males display their feet to woo a female. The intensity of the blue can vary from a pale turquoise to a deep aquamarine.

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The bird 2nd from left seems intent on the camera.

This quote from Wikipedia about the color of Booby feet is interesting: “The blue color of the blue-footed booby’s webbed feet comes from carotenoid pigments obtained from its diet of fresh fish. Carotenoids act as antioxidants and stimulants for the blue-footed booby’s immune function, suggesting that carotenoid-pigmentation is an indicator of an individual’s immunological state.”  Bottom line; the deeper the color the healthier the bird, and the more likely he is to get the girl.

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The cloud bank between the sailboat and land was interesting.

We have not seen an abundance of coral when we snorkel here in the SOC, which sort of surprises me since we see so many mammals like dolphin and sea lions. We see some fish when we snorkel and they offer the most color when we are underwater.  We have seen hues of green and brown and hardly any coral. The visibility under water has not been very good either.

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Stretching our legs on Isla Coronado. 

In my opinion, the dramatic landscape, the surfacing of dolphins or sea lions and the rays jumping out of the sea combined with the lack of color under the water means the views from on the boat or on land are more interesting than those below.

On the whole, the weather here has been much cooler than I expected. In fact, when we sail, I often put on a long sleeve shirt or a light jacket.  The water is still chilly and we are wearing wet suits if we get in the water.  I am sure there are places where the snorkeling or diving are excellent and hopefully we will find them next Fall when we return to the Sea of Cortez.

The local people we have met in towns and fishing villages here have been amazingly warm and deserve a post unto themselves.  I won’t expand on that now but in the future I hope to capture a sense of our experience and share it.

For now, we are enjoying the beauty of the Sea and watching the water and land to see what new surprises present themselves.

Thank you for taking time to read our blog.  We would love to hear from you if you have questions or comments.  You are welcome to visit our FB page where we hope to have enough connection to post pictures more often than we post here.

 

 

New Boats Are Not Like New Cars. Do we have issues?

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TTR before her departure from Xiamen.

So let’s state the obvious first: cars are mass produced and before the first one appears on a showroom floor hundreds of prototypes have been well and truly tested.  Then a bajillion cars are made and 99% of the time, any problem you take to your local dealer will have been addressed in another car before you arrive.

Boat builds are significantly fewer in number.  The number of units of a “mass” production boat model built is still in the 100s after a couple of years.

Ticket to Ride is one of only four HH55s produced to date, and each boat is customized to the specifications of the buyer. Due to this customization, some of the issues we face on TTR are probably different from issues the other three HH55 catamarans have experienced.

In addition to the uniqueness of each boat, our catamaran is a little city unto itself that must safely carry us from one port to the next and provide all of our electrical, refrigeration, water, power and navigational needs.

Given these facts, it is unrealistic to think that every system on TTR, or any other new boat, would be functioning perfectly at the time of delivery.

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La Paz under a full moon taken from where we are anchored.

Knowing we would have issues that needed to be addressed, we decided long before Ticket to Ride was delivered that we would spend a season living on board to figure out what is working and what needs fixing.  That is the purpose of our trip to the Sea of Cortez.

First let us reiterate that we are very pleased with our boat.  The quality and precision of the interior spaces; cabinetry, tech spaces, painted or veneered surfaces, etc are excellent and we are very impressed.

Ticket to Ride sails like a dream and is more capable than we are. I’m not saying we aren’t decent sailors, but this boat has excellent performance rigging, sails and equipment and she is set up to goooo.

But TTR does have some issues and in the spirit of sometimes removing our rose colored glasses, we will share a few of our current concerns and what is driving us to return to the U.S. for warranty work.  To date we have had very good service and response from Hudson Yacht Group with our questions and concerns. 

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The nav desk on TTR.

Perhaps the most complicated and potentially problematic system on Ticket to Ride is CZone; the electronic control and monitoring system that is the brain of everything with an electron flow on TTR. CZone essentially is the replacement for the AC and DC switching panels seen on most boats plus a whole lot more. With this computer brain and the touch of a screen, through CZone we can program our electrical system to fit our current situation. For example, TTR’s CZone system has 6 programmable modes such as “day cruise” or “anchored home” that allow one to turn off and on all the systems used in those situations with the touch of only a single button.  So when we press “day cruise,” VHFs, navigation screens, winches, etc all turn on when we touch that one button. CZONE is a beautiful thing and yes, there is the potential for problems.  After many, many hours reading manuals and technical support phone time with CZone Tech Support of New Zealand, the CZone, Frank and Mary Grace are living in harmony.

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The company responsible for our electronics package is Pochon out of France.  At the time of writing our purchasing contract, we tried to convince HH to use a U.S. company for this pivotal installation. We knew the chances of having everything right from the start were slim because the system interactions and programming are complicated.  We lost that battle and now we are facing a few disadvantages because our resource for fixing the electronics is a French speaking group in France. Between the inconvenience of differing time zones and language barriers, even issues discovered during the delivery phase are still not fixed.

Explaining the details of the electrical / electronic / navigational issues is complicated and more details than we think most of our readers would like to wade through. The summary is that we are having compatibility issues between CZone, B&G, Mastervolt and the Victron electronic components.  We would really like an expert to come on board to resolve the problems. We also need that expert to communicate clearly so we can become more efficient at modifying the system to meet our particular needs.

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Half of the solar panels on TTR.

The solar installation on TTR is excellent and our 1900 watts delivers so much power that we only run our generator once in a while to make sure it still works! The HH team did a first-rate job of adding the individual solar controllers Frank requested and as a result, our solar farm is producing about 80 percent of the energy we require! (The remainder is topped up by the engines when we motor.)

The wiring, neatness, detail and labeling of our boat electronics done at the HH Factory are amazing. Sailors who come on board and peek at our tech room are suitably impressed, as are we.  However, there are a few glitches in the wiring that need to be addressed.

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That is a pretty tech space!

There seems to be a multi-pronged issue with the wiring to our air conditioning units.  Anytime we try to run the port ACs (the side of the master berth), a relay fails, the inverter/generator reads overload and the ACs quit completely. Frank has spent a lot of time trying to trace the issue and with the consultation of Jessica, HH engineer extraordinaire, he has replaced the same relay switch twice.  Both of the new relays failed immediately. Our Northern Lights 9kw generator is powerful enough to run our ACs but the inverter isn’t recognizing the power coming from our generator and consistently shows “overload” and shuts down. 

Related to this problem is that the generator and inverter/charger aren’t talking well even for basic charging of the batteries.  If we try to charge the lithium batteries using the generator, the charger always shows “float” and never reads “bulk charge”  even when the batteries are low enough to accept bulk charge. Frank has spent a lot of time talking to Victron and MasterVolt (inverter/charger and batteries respectively) and neither is willing to work through the problem with us ie, there is some finger pointing going on. Somewhere there is a wiring issue or a setting issue or a communication error in these units.  This needs to be fixed as we won’t always be in sunny Mexico where solar power is an everyday full charge event.

We really like our B&G navigation/charting system but there are a few issues with it too.  Our AIS and VHF systems are not working consistently and when they do work, they only broadcast or receive information for a maximum of 2- 2.5 miles. Considering our air draft is 88 feet, we should easily transmit and receive for at least 8 miles.

(AIS is an automatic identification system used on vessels to identify traffic. Notices of ships nearby show on the electronic chart and information about that vessel’s size, speed and closest point of approach can be seen. This is a big help when sailing at night and very important because we want large container ships to know we are out on the ocean with them.)

Our B&G autopilot, aka Jude, is mostly excellent. Jude can hold to a wind setting or a heading very well.  She can follow a navigation route too. But sometimes Jude decides to change herself from navigating a route to just holding a heading… that would be like skipping a turn(s) when following directions. 

Speaking of autopilots, we intentionally outfitted TTR with a completely separate back up autopilot system. Our primary one is on the port side and is working. Our redundant system is supposed to be installed on the starboard side but we have absolutely no reading from it and do not think it has been completely installed.

Also, we have recalibrated our electronic compasses several times and there still seems to be some discrepancies between the true compass readings and the electronic readings.  We had our traditional compasses professionally swung before we left L.A. and we are confident that the error is in our electronic compasses.  This has a bit of a domino effect and can cause calculated electronic information to be wrong. Frank is confident this issue involves magnetic interference and relocation is the answer. The problem is finding a 6 meter NMEA 2000 cable in Mexico.

Small things still need to be addressed on TTR as well. Some of these include:

~ a light switch mix up where two unrelated lights turn on/off by the same switch.

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~ the enclosure around our helm station was made sooo tight that we cannot get it zipped all around, even when we had three people working together. 

~ the oven on the stove sometimes goes out without any apparent reason.

~ there is a leak from a vent box in the engine room that allows seawater into the area when we have following seas. (HH is fabricating and sending us a replacement to fix this problem.)

This is not an exhaustive list of things that need to be corrected on Ticket to Ride, but it does give you an idea of the types of issues we need to resolve when we get back to the U.S.

We must make a very special mention of Thomas and Riccardo of the HH Team.  These two men have done an amazing job of e-mailing with us, trying to troubleshoot our issues from the other side of the world.  They have been extremely prompt and thorough in their responses and we are truly grateful.  It is their responsiveness that keeps us positive that these issues will get resolved.

We are currently achored in La Paz, Mexico, preparing to move south to Cabo San Lucas where we will wait for a good weather window to sail back north toward Ensenada, Mexico and eventually California. 

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Frank is trying to get a few things resolved on our Spectra water maker before we leave here.  Yes, there are a few bugs relating to the water maker, but so much progress has been made with it that I am not even listing it as a problem anymore.  However, kudos to Spectra WaterMaker support and Riccardo of HH.  They have been extremely responsive to Frank’s e-mails and phone calls and so far  we have been able to make water all along even with the problems!! (Everyone knock on wood, please!)

Phew, so there you have another “report” from TTR.  I promise, the next post will be full of pretty sights from the Sea of Cortez.

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Sunset from our anchorage in Isla Coronados.

Thank you for reading our blog. Our posts are pretty sporadic right now because our connectivity is hit or miss here in Mexico. I try to post to the FB page to at least share some of the beauty of this area but I am limited by access. Thank you for stopping by.

Dolphin Reef

As Frank and I were leaving Isla Coronados on Thursday, we saw waves in the distance we thought might indicate a reef or shallow area.

We double and triple checked the charts, which are completely incorrect here. But we saw nothing.

Binoculars revealed the disturbance was a huge pod of dolphins! We estimated about 500 dolphin in this pod.

Needless to say it was a blast watching these guys swim around.

We idled in the area of the dolphins for about 30 minutes just watching them jumping and cavorting.

We could hear them chattering to each other as they swam. We were surprised how much noise they created.

Wow! I only wish I could share with you how fun it was to see these guys.

Thanks for stopping by. Please see our FB page, HH55 Ticket To Ride, for more regular updates.

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