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Jumping Rays! Mobula Edge Out Mantas.

Although we are securely tied to a marina in Long Beach, CA, the memory of the jumping rays we saw in Los Frailes, Mexico is still fresh and vibrant. As we headed south toward La Paz, we stopped one afternoon to anchor in Los Frailes and were greeted by the distinct sound of belly flops.

Most folks who have spent any time near a public swimming pool would recognize the sound of a belly flop.  This day in Los Frailes we heard that smack over and over and over again.

Rays

Wings up for a smack of a landing!

Ray after ray after ray was launching out of the blue sea and slapping back down into the water! Of course we anchored as quickly as we could, then lowered the dinghy and slowly approached the rays.

Wait for the slow motion jumping – they are beautiful!

Our haste was unnecessary as the rays jumped and splatted for hours – literally!

There were so many rays jumping that we feared one would land in the dinghy and we weren’t sure how we would manage to get it out without injuring it or us.  So we returned to Ticket To Ride and enjoyed the show from the boat.

Hours later the rays were still jumping. In fact, when we went to bed we could still hear the repeated plops through the open hatch.  Even when we awakened, the rays were still jumping.

Rays-2

Mr. Ray mid-flight.

There are a few theories about why rays jump out of the water like this:

  1. They are trying to remove parasites. (Yuck)
  2. They are excited about food in the area.
  3. This is a form of communication.
  4. This is part of a mating ritual or dance.

Personally, I think this was a combination of numbers two and four since the jumping lasted for well over 12 hours! Either that or these rays were particularly talkative or especially dirty.   🙂

I was trying to determine if these were Mobula or Manta Rays, but according to Dive Magazine, UK, there are no more Manta Rays, only Mobula, at least when determining scientific classifications.  This combination of Mantas and Mobulas comes after a DNA study that reclassified Mantas into the Mobulas species.

While the DNA may classify these rays as one group, there are some physical differences. The primary difference is that the Manta Ray has its’ mouth in front of the body and the Mobula’s mouth is positioned a little further back, but still in front of the body.

Rays-1

My favorite picture of the rays.

Regardless of how the rays are classified, they were an excellent source of entertainment that day in Los Frailes.  Every once in a while the slapping sound would stop and the bay would quiet. But soon enough the rays would begin their jump and flop once more and the sound alone would bring a smile to my face.

Thank you for reading our blog. We would love to hear about your favorite ray experiences or your thoughts about our encounter. If you would like to hear from us more often, please check out our FB page.

 

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