The Baja Bash ~ Bashing 750 NM Toward California.

So we had heard a lot about the “bash” up the western coast of the Baja Peninsula required to return to California even before we left Newport Beach in March. But we figured we would face that bash when the time came.

Well the time has come and thankfully, “The Bash” is pretty much finished. We are nestled into a marina in Ensenada and are happy to be settled for a few days! (San Diego is a mere 60 miles north and Long Beach an additional 85.)

Baja Bash

Sunrise on passage – always SO welcome.

We stayed longer in the Sea of Cortez than anticipated because we enjoyed it ~ there is just so much to see. But with two named storms already in the Eastern Pacific, we knew we had to get moving north.

A reasonable weather window developed so we departed Puerto Los Cabos in San José del Cabo, at 7 am on July 4th.  While our compatriots were celebrating with BBQs, picnics and fireworks, we were beginning our trek north.

I believe we chose a good window for our trip, so we cannot complain about the choice of our weather.  In fact, along the way we ended up in VHF conversations with 5 other boats who had chosen the same timing to move north; two sailboats and three trawlers.

Fortunately we didn’t encounter winds above 19 knots, but when they are coming on your nose they are tiring.  The seas were also cooperative with most of them in the one meter range and none over 1.6 meters.

We even had some time to sail TTR on this trip!

As I have stated, two main reasons we bought our HH55 are her ability to sail well in many conditions and comfort. Ticket To Ride did not disappoint us in her sailing on this slog.

Over the 754 nautical mile, 5 day trip, we were able to sail at least a full 24 hours – that is without any engine assistance.  Our usual sailing wind angle for this trip was a true wind angle of 50-55 degrees with an apparent wind angle of 28-32 degrees. Even pinched up that tightly we were able to hold our course and TTR sailed faster than we could have motored.  We were often clipping through the water at close to 8 knots SOG with a current against us.

We also spent a good amount of time motor sailing with either our genoa or mail sail up.

The benefit of sailing instead of motoring, in addition to speed, is the comfort of the boat motion plowing through waves.  When sailing, the boat is much quieter because she moves through the water with less banging into the wave troughs and the engine is off.

I find the constant noise of upwind trips fatiguing, so sailing allowed us a slight sensory break.

The work on our AIS/VHF that we had done in La Paz has certainly improved our reception and transmission of our VHF.  The AIS is also improved but we suspect the unit itself might be faulty as it sometimes ‘goes out.’ Fortunately when Frank disconnected and reconnected it, the AIS resumed.**

Frank did a little fishing, without success. Well he did manage to catch one, but not a keeper….

Baja Bash-1.jpg

Frank carefully unhooked this guy and pushed him back into the water.

Clayton researched this shark for me and has decided it is a long fin mako. Any ‘sharksperts’ out there who want to confirm or correct this?

One of the trawlers we saw during the trek is here at The Marina Coral.  It is a beautiful Nordhavn 65′ yacht that also started at Marina Puerto Los Cabos and they completed the trip more quickly than we did.  The captain estimates they used slightly more than 800 gallons of fuel compared to our 150 gallons for this trip.

I found it interesting to have a mile for mile comparison on fuel consumption between the trawler and TTR. I wish I knew exactly how long the trip took them. Don’t take this as a criticism of motor boats…. someday sailing may become too much for us and we might move to one.

The weather has definitely changed already. While in the SOC, we never saw rain and rarely saw any clouds.  It was hot and the water was a welcome respite from the heat. But now the clouds cover the early morning sky and burn off throughout the morning and the weather is much cooler – long pants and a jacket are definitely possible.

All in all, our bash was tiring from a noise and motion standpoint. The boat performed well and we felt very secure on TTR.  Generally the days were less windy than the nights and we had little or no moonlight so it was dark! Other than the boats mentioned above, we saw a tug pulling a barge piled with salt (daytime thankfully) and at night a few fishing boats. The local fishing boats have very little light but thankfully they would shine a bright light our direction and we would reply with a white light acknowledging their location. Oh and we saw a Carnival Cruise Ship as we were entering Ensenada.

Baja Bash-2

I think everyone loves dolphins!

Other than those few ships, our greatest entertainment was the dolphins we saw occasionally.  The dolphin usually appeared when I was pretty fed up with the banging motion so I found them an especially delightful distraction!

We were definitely ready to arrive in Ensenada and enjoy less motion and more quiet. As always, we are thankful for a completed and safe passage.

**Although this AIS problem is a warranty issue, we do not consider it a fault of HH Catamarans. Likely this is an issue within the AIS unit itself. I sometimes think todays electronics are mass produced and never really tested; just sent out assuming it is cheaper to replace a faulty one than spend the time and labor on quality control.

Thank you for stopping by to read our blog. If you want to hear from us more often, please check out our FB page: HH55 Ticket To Ride.

Posted on July 9, 2019, in Ticket to Ride, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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